Interview

Death Row & Political Power – A Chat with ViaPlay’s “Cell 8” Actor Freddie Wise. Out April 13! #ViaPlay #Cell8 #FreddieWise @viaplay @rmediavilla

Interview by Rafy Mediavilla, Death Row & Political Power – A Chat with ViaPlay’s “Cell 8” Actor Freddie Wise. Premieres April 13 On ViaPlay Streaming Service.

Based on Roslund & Hellström’s best-selling novel, Cell 8 follows detectives Mariana Hermansson (award-winning actress Mimosa Willamo, Box 21, Deadwind) and Ewert Grens (Leonard Terfelt, Young Royals) as they get into a mysterious and increasingly dark series of events. In Sweden, John Schwarz (Freddie Wise, Poldark), a man presumed dead, is arrested for assault on a ferry to Finland. The case soon reveals a personal connection not only to Hermansson herself but to a Death Row prisoner in the U.S. and a grieving parent, Edward Finnigan (Richard Lintern, Silent Witness), consumed by the quest for revenge. Although many years have passed, Finnigan will not be able to find peace until he can avenge the murder of his daughter. Co-starring Will Thorp (All Creatures Great and Small).


Criticólogos:

I don’t want to enter into details because I think part of how this story works so well because not everything is not what it seems. So I wonder when you got the project, what was it that told you, hey, I need to do this?

Freddie Wise:

Where I think, um, I think you hear a lot of actors say this, but it was a part where I was like, Oh, I don’t know if I could actually do this. I was pretty scared and felt it was a performance that could go absolutely horribly wrong, which excited me. And I think like, I was sort of, I knew I would have to work. And I think what was exciting was that the parts are very different to me, in a completely different environment that I’m accustomed to, and have a different accent.

I think there was a lot that I could get stuck into straight away. Um, so, yeah, and then I met you and the director who was incredible and a really exciting sort of movie references, um, like prisoners, um, and just how he was going to, you know, just, and he was really technical, and I thought that was also quite exciting. So yeah, and I met him and then, uh, Mimosa, who plays Mariana, the police chief. Um, she was just incredible. And so, the kind of genuine opportunity to work with her was really exciting to me as well.

Criticólogos:

I wonder when they get gave you the scripts. Did you have the whole picture? They just kept giving you something to keep the surprise coming, or do you have the whole picture from the beginning?

Freddie Wise:

I had the whole picture. I had read the book, which again, that very ends the same way. and again, that was a really exciting thing too. That was one of the other reasons why I was so excited about the project is the way it completely commits to it, um, to its message or, you know, just complete, you know, the show is about death row and the death penalty and it really does, it commits to that idea, which I found really exciting and I think quite interesting that the lead character is such a sort of passenger in it all. He has no ownership. He makes, you know, he is very much like a pawn in the whole story, which again, was really interesting.

Criticólogos:

There are so many themes that were touched upon in the story aside from death row and the whole power politics. I wonder if you were just surprised when you read the book, how your character went about it, and that they stick to the whole narrative from the book?

Freddie Wise:

I was surprised. And I think it’s just it definitely plays with sort of story conventions. The plot kind of pulls the rug underneath you and sort of sets up a kind of stock. You know, archetype kind of characters, archetype kind of story, and you sort of think it’s going to go somewhere and then it completely veers off into the next direction. Um, and hopefully, yeah, that’s what people will sort of take from it.

I hope that people kind of, you know, and again, and I think obviously that’s what’s helpful about sort having off, you know, with Roslund and Hallström being not American, having that sort of they’re kind of looking at that, looking at that world from a sort of outsider’s viewpoint. And with that kind of they’re very sort of tough and they don’t sort of won’t hold back on anything.

Criticólogos:

What was the most difficult part of channeling John getting into his shoes and into his character? Because it’s so complicated everything that it’s going on with his character.

Freddie Wise:

It’s a really good question. When I read the book the thing that kind of excited me and kind of latched onto is that he’s kind of in a constant state of trauma. Even when he’s sort of like no more seemingly more relaxed. He’s just in a place of trauma the whole time. And I thought that was a real challenge and like a really exciting challenge. How can you do that? That isn’t exhausting for an audience that it would just become boring. So, it was really important that again, as I’m saying, like, he has no control of what’s going on and he’s someone who just has never felt, uh, freedom or he’s been able to have a choice in his entire life. I really wanted to capture that. And so, to kind of get yourself into that headspace of, of someone and when I was doing the research on death row, the kind of the levels of when you hear people day to day, you’re in those cells 24 hours a day. They’re tiny, you know, and you don’t know when you know your execution is going to come. I think that and the level of depression that, you know, that’s an unbelievable amount of. That’s it’s a form of torture in a way, you know, unbelievable turmoil to put on a human being. So, kind of just to get that kind of state of being in sort of constant trauma is a challenge I wanted to push myself.  

See the interview below:

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